Search
Search
Truck Accident

Can I Sue For a Car Accident That Occurs in Another State?

Date:
By Earnest Art
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Can I sue for a car accident that happened in another state

Depending on the law in your state and the laws of the state where the accident occurred, there are different factors that could affect whether you can sue for your injuries. For example, witness memories fade over time and evidence can be lost or destroyed.

You must speak with a car accident lawyer licensed in the state where your crash happened to get the most accurate advice. Some lawyers offer phone or video consultations and can handle the case remotely.

Insurance

Car accident cases are always complex, but when the incident involves a driver from another state, there may be additional legal considerations. At Laborde Earles, our experienced car accident lawyers can help you unravel the complicated legal process and fight for your rights to fair compensation.

Even in minor accidents, it’s important to call the police so they can examine the scene and document any damage. They will also file a report that will be useful if you later need to submit your claim for damages.

It’s also important to exchange insurance information with the other driver at the scene. But remember not to say anything that could be construed as an admission of guilt or fault. It’s also a good idea to take photos of the vehicles, the scene, and any relevant landmarks. If possible, you should also try to collect any other evidence at the scene, such as weather conditions or any other relevant factors that might affect your case down the road.

Statute of Limitations

If you do not file a lawsuit within the statute of limitations, your legal claims will be time-barred and you will lose your right to compensation. Moreover, physical evidence may deteriorate over time. An experienced attorney can help you identify all applicable deadlines and statutes of limitations in your case.

The laws in different states vary. A judge will decide how a car accident case is resolved based on the state law that applies. For example, New York uses comparative negligence laws to determine damages in no-fault accidents while limited tort limits the types of damages an injured victim can claim for a personal injury case.

Some injuries may not manifest symptoms immediately after a crash, such as traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) and internal bleeding. Fortunately, there are exceptions to the statute of limitations in such cases. An experienced Allentown car accident lawyer will help you navigate these circumstances and understand your timetable for filing a lawsuit.

Liability

Getting in an accident is always a difficult and stressful situation, but when you’re dealing with out-of-state drivers it can be even more complex. At Laborde Earles Injury Lawyers, we can help you navigate through the legal steps to get the compensation that you deserve.

The first step is collecting as much evidence as possible. This includes taking photos of the scene, obtaining witness contact information, and anything else that may be helpful to your case.

Another factor to consider is what type of jurisdiction the accident occurred in. As a general rule, you can sue in the state where the accident happened or in the state where the defendant (the at-fault driver) resides. However, some states have different rules regarding this. For example, New York has pure comparative fault rules which allow victims to seek damages if they are a certain percentage responsible for the crash. This is different than the majority of other states which have modified comparative fault rules.

Damages

A car accident that occurs in another state can add a layer of complexity to the situation. The insurance and legal processes will vary from state to state, as well as the statutes of limitations. A trusted personal injury attorney can help you unravel the complicated legal steps and fight for your right to compensation.

If you are involved in a car accident out of state, you should do the following:

Immediately call your insurance company. Be sure to tell them where the crash took place and how you were injured. Refrain from making any admissions of guilt at the scene. Always document the crash scene with pictures and witness testimony. If possible, take down the other driver’s name and insurance information. Also, make sure to meet reporting deadlines with the DMV and your insurer. Lastly, collect any evidence, including medical records, that supports your claims. If your injuries are serious, they should qualify you for substantial damages.

Share with your friends on
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
RELATED NEWS
Truck Accident
Date:
There are many parties involved in a construction accident. The worker may be the only...
Truck Accident
Date:
What Accidents Apply to Personal Injury Law? There are a few common accidents that fall...
Truck Accident
Date:
When you file a lawsuit for a personal injury, you need an attorney to represent...
LATEST NEWS
Featured ArticlesMain News
Date:
Each year, many elderly patients suffer abuse or neglect at the hands of nursing home...
Main NewsSlip and Fall
Date:
Many people have questions about what happens if they are partially at fault for an...
Car Accident
Date:
The terms personal injury and bodily injury frequently appear in insurance industry language, particularly in...